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Friday, April 29, 2016

2016 NFL Draft Grades



si.com


  • 1. LOS ANGELES RAMS
    GRADE: B-
    The first question is, how does Goff—who ran a “Bear-Raid” offense at Cal—fit into the Rams' power scheme with limited passing options? He'll have to adjust protections, which he hasn't really done before. It helps that the onus won't be on him to throw 50 times a game in a complex system, but this is a worrying pick given everything the Rams gave up to move to No. 1. Goff is good under pressure for the most part, and he's used to throwing to iffy receivers, but systemically, it could be argued that Carson Wentz, who ran a more diverse power-based offense at North Dakota State, would have been the better fit here.

  • 2. PHILADELPHIA EAGLES
    GRADE: A
    Don’t debit Wentz because he played in the Missouri Valley Football Conference—he’s more NFL-ready than you may think. He has great mobility, the size to run QB power like Cam Newton and a full read palette that belies his small-school history. The Eagles got the second quarterback in this draft class, but in the end, they may well have selected the better one overall. Think Ben Roethlisberger as a long-term comparison.

  • 3. SAN DIEGO CHARGERS
    GRADE: D
    This is a curious pick, when you consider that Bosa may not be the best defensive lineman in this draft class, and he's a tweener for San Diego's 3–4 scheme. If he keeps his weight down and plays OLB, he's got average speed and will have to max out his technique. If he bulks up as a 3–4 end, that's a separate issue when it comes to his speed. The Chargers are clearly betting on Bosa's football intellect, but they may bump up against his low ceiling sooner rather than later. Think of Chris Long as a comparison—a really good run defender whose sack totals will be relatively low. DeForest Buckner does most of what the Chargers want better than Bosa does.​

  • 4. DALLAS COWBOYS
    GRADE: A
    This is a natural pick for the Cowboys, because they have the best run-blocking line in the league, but they haven’t been able to replace DeMarco Murray’s production. Elliott is comparable to LaDainian Tomlinson because he runs so well between the tackles, he’s shifty outside and he’s a tremendous blocker. Like Tomlinson did after his stint at TCU, Elliott can also blossom into a top-notch receiver. Not that he needs huge gaps to make things happen, but he’s going to get them running behind this line, and we could be talking about a future rushing champ here. Elliott will define the Cowboys’ offense through the end of the Romo era and beyond.

  • 5. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS
    GRADE: A+
    Ramsey is the top player in this year's SI 50, and Jags head coach Gus Bradley must be a bit gobsmacked by his own good luck here. What makes Ramsey special is that he's truly scheme-transcendent at multiple positions—cornerback, safety, and slot defender—and he'll be a force multiplier for Jacksonville's defense from the start. Jacksonville would be smart to start him off as a safety and nickel slot defender. That way, the Jags can take a year developing his CB skills and awaiting his development into the next Charles Woodson. This is a huge addition to an improving defense.

  • 6. BALTIMORE RAVENS
    GRADE: B
    Stanley may be the best pass-blocking tackle in this draft class, though his run-blocking leaves something to be desired. While Laremy Tunsil is the better player, Stanley has more upside. In any case, Stanley can kick over to the right side in the short term and sub in seamlessly for Eugene Monroe if Monroe gets hurt or is a cap casualty. Stanley has the look of a multi-Pro Bowl left tackle if he can get his upper-body strength together and better seal defenders to the edge in running plays.

  • 7. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS
    GRADE: A
    The 49ers take who the Chargers should have taken with the third overall pick. Unlike Joey Bosa, Buckner actually is the best defensive lineman in this class, with the ability to dominate everywhere from head-over nose tackle to wide-nine defensive end. He is not a carbon copy of Arik Armstead, the former Oregon teammate the 49ers took in the first round last year—Armstead is half the player Buckner is right now. Buckner looks like a faster, more flexible Calais Campbell with all of Campbell's power. This is a major boost for a San Francisco defense that has lost more than its share of stars over the last two seasons.

  • 8. TENNESSEE TITANS
    GRADE: B
    This is an amazing get for the Titans and new general manager Jon Robinson. They traded down from the No. 1 pick, got most of the Rams’ next two drafts and picked up the offensive lineman they wanted. Now, the question is whether Conklin stays on the left side—he's a tremendous run-blocker with limited pass-protection ability at this point. Conklin can be an elite blindside tackle in a power system over time, and he could also move inside to guard. He’s probably the most fundamentally sound blocker in this class, so the Titans are winning this draft already. Should Tunsil have been the pick instead? That question docks this pick a letter.

  • 9. CHICAGO BEARS
    GRADE: B-
    Floyd does fit the NFL's preference for rangy, big linebackers who can do a lot of things. At 6' 6" and 244 pounds, Floyd can careen off the edge as adeptly as he drops into coverage. However, he'll have to be used a certain way, because he lacks the tackling strength to take on running backs consistently. Chicago signed Danny Trevathan and Jerrell Freeman in the off-season to reinforce their weak linebacker corps, so defensive coordinator Vic Fangio will have the option to move Floyd around. The low grade has more to do with Floyd's slight build—he could be Barkevious Mingo or Bruce Irvin just as easily as he could be an elite pass-rusher at the next level.

  • 10. NEW YORK GIANTS
    GRADE: B
    Though they signed Janoris Jenkins in the off-season, there was still a clear need for more help at cornerback for the G-Men. Apple fits as a natural press-man defender with tremendous aggressiveness and the ability to redirect receivers where he wants them to go. One could question whether Mackensie Alexander or Vernon Hargreaves is the better talent pick here, but the Giants want cornerbacks who are aggressive to the point of failure, and Apple fits the bill. He’ll have to watch the penalties, to be sure.

  • 11. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS
    GRADE: A-
    Many mocks had Hargreaves to the Bucs, given their issues at cornerback in 2015, and full marks to them for giving the Bears their No. 9 pick and still getting their man. Hargreaves is an aggressive, athletic player with a no-fear attitude in run support. He's also one of the best pattern-readers in this class, which will help him against better receivers. On the downside, he does get beaten deep, and there are concerns about his height (5' 10"). But he's matched up against the best the SEC has to offer, and he has the potential to do the same in the NFL.

  • 12. NEW ORLEANS SAINTS
    GRADE: A+
    The Saints need all kinds of help on their defensive line, and Rankins is an absolute monster in the Sheldon Richardson mold. Rankins can play head-over-nose, three-tech and five-tech. His short arms could affect his ability to hold blockers off, but he’s a high-motor guy who will be even better when he adds to his limited palette of hand moves. A huge coup for New Orleans.

  • 13. MIAMI DOLPHINS
    GRADE: A
    Tunsil's drop in the draft for an old video of him goofing around with a gas mask and a smokable substance aside, the Dolphins may have picked up the steal of the draft. Tunsil had the cleanest tape of any prospect in this draft. From run-blocking to pass protection to picking up stunts and zone pressures, there's nobody better in 2016, and few better in recent years. As long as that video isn't indicative of any further issues, Tunsil is a huge addition to an offense in need of blocking help. He gave up no sacks and no quarterback hits in 2015 for Ole Miss. Tyron Smith is a good comparison.

  • 14. OAKLAND RAIDERS
    GRADE: C
    An interesting pick for a team in need of secondary help. Reggie McKenzie has done a lot to put the Raiders back on track, and Joseph is a big hitter with some coverage ability. He'll replace Charles Woodson, which is a major thing to do. But at 5' 10" and 205 pounds, he's a little light for the position at the NFL level. Bob Sanders will be the ideal, but Sanders was an outlier, and he was also hurt a lot. Size debits combined with a physical style seems to be a recipe for danger, but Joseph is a true competitor.

  • 15. CLEVELAND BROWNS
    GRADE: B
    Coleman is unquestionably the most explosive receiver in this class, with the ability to flat-out smoke anyone covering him. In addition, and surprisingly enough for a pure spread offense like Baylor's, he does have a natural sense of route development. Most likely, Cleveland will have to work with what he can do in the short term, while teaching him the full route tree over time. Is he a No. 1 receiver in the Antonio Brown mold? That's a stretch, and it's hard to rationalize this pick with Josh Doctson still on the board. But this guy can really fly.

  • 16. DETROIT LIONS
    GRADE: B-
    A safe pick for a team in desperate need of better pass protection. Matthew Stafford has been sacked a ton in the last two seasons, and Riley Reiff hasn't shown the ability to hold up on the blind side. Decker will have to keep his body lean low to avoid getting overpowered, but he is one of the better run blockers in this class. Some may question his potential as a left tackle in the long term, and if he can't hang on that side, this could prove to be a major mistake.

  • 17. ATLANTA FALCONS
    GRADE: C
    Falcons coach Dan Quinn was in Seattle for the rise of Kam Chancellor, and Neal fits a similar profile. At 6' 0" and 211 pounds, he's a feared hitter who needs development in coverage. Quinn saw Chancellor become a great cover guy over time, but spending the No. 17 pick on a prospect who's best in the box and limited everywhere else is a questionable strategy at best. I'd be surprised if half the teams in the league didn't have him in the second round.​

  • 18. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS
    Grade: B
    A very safe pick for general manager Ryan Grigson, who has made his share of head-scratchers in the last few years. Andrew Luck has been getting killed with pressure up the middle, and Kelly can come right in and make a big difference. He's a road-grader at the point of attack, but he can also move to the second level and dominate when asked to seal-block linebackers and safeties. Kelly becomes the first solid center for the franchise since Jeff Saturday.

  • 19. BUFFALO BILLS
    GRADE: B
    Don't call Lawson a one-year wonder—it was tough for him to find starting time earlier in his career along Clemson's deep line. He amassed 35 solo tackles, 12.5 sacks and 24.5 tackles for loss in 2015, and he combined the edge speed to beat tackles outside with the power to move guards inside. He's not the same type of player as Mario Williams, but he may put up similar pressure numbers over time. He needs a little technique work, but where better to hone that than within a Rex Ryan defense?

  • 20. NEW YORK JETS
    GRADE: B+
    The Jets need more players with real movement skills, and with Myles Jack's medicals pulling him down the board, Lee may very well be the next-best option. He won't impress anyone with his size (6' 1", 232 pounds), but remember that Jets coach Todd Bowles was in Arizona when Karlos Dansby and Daryl Washington were redefining what mobile linebackers could do. Now, Bowles has his own cover linebacker who can tackle pretty well, rush a bit and cover everything from curl-flat to seam routes. From that perspective, it's a good pick. Those who are unimpressed are just going to have to realize that the 230-pound linebacker is the wave of the future.

  • 21. HOUSTON TEXANS
    GRADE: A-
    Adding Fuller to a receiver corps already blessed with DeAndre Hopkins is a force multiplier for the Houston offense. While Hopkins is the do-it-all guy, Fuller is a pure speed burner who will take the top off any coverage. He's not physically dominant, he'll drop passes and he needs work with the full route tree, but he's going to help this offense a ton. Factor in the free agent additions of Brock Osweiler and Lamar Miller, and Bill O'Brien has himself a pretty formidable offense all of a sudden.

  • 22. WASHINGTON REDSKINS
    GRADE: A+
    Doctson has been one of the most productive receivers in the nation in the last two seasons, and on tape his talent backs up all those numbers. Doctson is especially strong when asked to compete with cornerbacks and safeties on 50/50 balls, and he combines size, strength and speed to be one of the class's best talents at any position. Kirk Cousins just got himself a very good red-zone target and a perfect fit for Jay Gruden's West Coast offense.

  • 23. MINNESOTA VIKINGS
    GRADE: A
    First of all, the talk about Treadwell's lack of speed is overblown—in Ole Miss's limited passing offense, he was often open and unseen. He's a tough, physical, consistent receiver who won't set any land speed records against deep safeties, but he has the skills to become Minnesota's top target. Yes, that's a low bar at this point, but GM Rick Spielman has to start somewhere. Add Treadwell to Stefon Diggs in the Vikings' receiver battery, and things are looking up for Teddy Bridgewater.​

  • 24. CINCINNATI BENGALS
    GRADE: B
    With most of the top receivers off the board, the Bengals turn to another need and draft Jackson, a natural press boundary cornerback with the tools and skills to stand up to the fastest and most physical receivers in the league over time. Last season, he put up 34 solo tackles, five interceptions (two returned for touchdowns) and 23 pass deflections to lead the nation in that category. He's a do-it-all player at a key position, though he'll have to get more efficient with his feet to avoid getting turned completely around by more savvy NFL receivers.

  • 25. PITTSBURGH STEELERS
    GRADE: C
    Steelers general manager Kevin Colbert has a history of slightly overdrafting defensive players from a value perspective, and Burns fits that category. He's a ridiculous athlete who has overcome a difficult past, but he's going to need time to deal with the complexities of NFL route concepts. This is a person you want to root for, and in time, it's a player who will start and succeed. It's just tough to pick a developmental guy when your team needs cornerback help right now.

  • 26. DENVER BRONCOS
    GRADE: B+
    After losing Brock Osweiler to the Texans in free agency, the Broncos traded up with the Seahawks to take the most Osweiler-y quarterback in this draft class. Lynch stands 6' 7" and weighs 235 pounds, but he's very mobile, and his familiarity with boot action concepts makes him a perfect fit for what Gary Kubiak wants to do. Lynch may need a year or so to learn the complexities of the NFL game, but he might be put on an accelerated track with a somewhat simplified version of the Broncos' scheme.

  • 27. GREEN BAY PACKERS
    GRADE: A
    This isn't a sexy pick, given Clark's relative inability to rush the passer, but Clark is an instant wall for a defensive line in need of stability. At 6' 3" and 314 pounds, he can play 3-tech in a four-man front, or kick out to end in a 3–4 base. He's also a natural nose tackle with tremendous strength, and he's only 20 years old—he's got a lot of great football in front of him. He may be a two-down rotational guy to start his NFL career, with the opportunity to do a lot more.

  • 28. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS
    GRADE: B
    When the 49ers were crushing opponents with Jim Harbaugh's rushing attack, Mike Iupati was decimating opponents with his power at left guard. Garnett projects well as a similar player. He's a pure power guy who may need a bit of adjustment in Chip Kelly's zone scheme. Garnett has the talent to switch, and though it may take time for that to happen, he's going to be a special player over time. It's just a matter of scheme fit and how much you believe it's worth it to spend three picks to trade back into the first round for a guard.

  • 29. ARIZONA CARDINALS
    GRADE: A-
    The Cardinals get one of the most dominant players in this class regardless of position, as Nkemdiche can be a real problem from any gap. His off-field issues will have to be vetted, as well as the concern that he doesn't get everything out of his potential on the field, but if Bruce Arians can corral Nkemdiche's talent as he did with Tyrann Mathieu, Arizona now has a run-stopping monster with the ability to rush the passer no matter where he is on the line.

  • 30. CAROLINA PANTHERS
    GRADE: A
    Losing Josh Norman means that the Panthers will need to reinforce their defense in other ways, because there wasn't an equivalent talent to Norman on the board at 30. Butler may have received small-school dings from some, but his tape screams NFL starter. He's 6' 4" and 323 pounds with great length, and he combines the speed and strength to take up any gap. He can also hold his own in coverage, and he'll command double teams on most every play.

  • 31. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS
    GRADE: C
    The Seahawks have had all sorts of issues with their offensive line over the last few seasons, so it's at least good that they're addressing it in the first round for the first time since they took Russell Okung in 2010. However, Ifedi is a bit of a tweener at this point: very strong in his run sets but a work in progress as a pass protector. Perhaps the idea is to move him inside or see how he'll work at right tackle, but this doesn't do much for the worst position group in the NFL.






YahooSports
Eric Edholm
Here's a look at the 31 picks, with knee-jerk reactions and grades:
1) Los Angeles Rams: QB Jared Goff – This pick has been in pretty much since the Rams moved up dramatically from No. 15 to 1, even if they kept the mystery going for a few weeks. Goff is a rhythm passer who has spent three years in the “Bear Raid” offense, and there will be a transition to more of a pro system with a first-year passing coordinator and a second-year QB coach. Patience, Rams fans. Grade: B Jared Goff goes from the Bay Area to Los Angeles. (AP)
2) Philadelphia Eagles: QB Carson Wentz – The impressive Wentz won two titles as a starter at the FCS level and has everything you want in a quarterback physically. He also is a mature, grounded person, and that will serve him well in a tough town. There's a crowd at QB with the Eagles, but if he's the best man for the job it will all sort out in time. It's a long road from Fargo to Philly, but if there's ever a town that can embrace the underdog … Grade: B
3) San Diego Chargers: DL/LB Joey Bosa – Yes, linebacker. In the 3-4 scheme, Bosa will stand up and attack the quarterback from two feet instead of the two-point stance he rushed from all through high school and at Ohio State. He's a hard-charging, athletic and instinctive rusher, but the pick is odd considering the Chargers' rushers: Melvin Ingram, Jeremiah Attaochu and Kyle Emmanuel. Bosa's laid-back attitude will work well in sleepy San Diego, but passing on Jalen Ramsey feels foolish. Grade: C+
4) Dallas Cowboys: RB Ezekiel Elliott – Presented a situation they might not have expected given the pick before, the Cowboys still took the player that team owner Jerry Jones has been rumored to be in love with for months. There was an internal debate over which player fit best here, but the Cowboys now have the most well-rounded RB prospect in years operating behind the league's best offensive line. Good luck with that, NFC East. This could help extend Tony Romo's career a year or two. Again, no Ramsey?Grade: B+
5) Jacksonville Jaguars: DB Jalen Ramsey – This is a dream scenario for GM Dave Caldwell and head coach Gus Bradley, who now have upgraded their defense with a Day 1 impact defender. Ramsey is expected to play corner and nickel, and he also can impact special teams. What an unbelievable stroke of luck for the Jaguars, who hope to match their explosive offense with a competitive defense. Grade: A
6) Baltimore Ravens: OL Ronnie Stanley – The Ravens had Stanley graded above Ole Miss' Laremy Tunsil for some time now, so while the pick might be shocking to some. The athletic, smart Stanley can be a Day 1 starter at right tackle, which was a need, and take over for Eugene Monroe down the road. With Stanley and John Urschel, if nothing else the Ravens have perhaps the most intelligent offensive line in the NFL. Grade: B

7) San Francisco 49ers: DL DeForest Buckner – Chip Kelly and especially defensive line coach Jerry Azzinaro (with whom Buckner is extremely tight) signed off on this pick early, and though there were other options for the team, this was a no-brainer. For the second straight year, the 49ers select an Oregon 5-technique, and this one was even better than 2015 first-rounder Arik Armstead. Buckner should be a star who can play a high volume of snaps and wreck blocking schemes. Grade: A-
8) Tennessee Titans: OL Jack Conklin ‐ The Titans did a lot of work on Laremy Tunsil and were roundly rumored to have been considering him with the first pick had they stayed put and not made a monster deal with the Rams. Now they trade up from No. 15, armed with plenty of ammo, to get … Conklin? This is wild. Perhaps the poorly timed video posted on a social media account belonging to Tunsil had some effect, but the Titans like the old-school grit of Conklin, who gives the Titans two gnarly anchors to protect Marcus Mariota and gear up the run game with DeMarco Murray. This is the exotic smashmouth they want to run. Grade: B-
9. Chicago Bears: LB Leonard Floyd – The Bears leapfrogged the Giants, who were looking hard at some of the same players they were, including Floyd, so the move made sense from that perspective. But be suspicious of Floyd, who can be overpowered in the run game, is very lean and is in need of some pass-rush development. However, he has sky-high potential to hound the Aaron Rodgers of the world. A classic boom-bust pick.Grade: C
10. New York Giants: CB Eli Apple – Apple to the Big Apple. How about that? This is a surprise – not to see another Buckeye in the top 10 but to see a grabby, flawed corner who rated well below several others still available on other teams' boards. The Giants have starters in Janoris Jenkins and (we assume) Dominique Rodgers-Cromartie on the outside, and Apple might not be a great fit in the nickel. Confusing. Grade: C-
11. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: CB Vernon Hargreaves III – Seriously, this is too perfect. The Tampa kid comes up, and it fills a huge need. The Bucs' best corner by the end of the season was Sterling Moore, so that tells you what you need. Hargreaves likely would have been the pick at No. 9 had they not traded down, so they add the Bears' fourth-rounder and still get their guy. Hargreaves is a great cover corner who is small but highly instinctive. Grade: A-
12. New Orleans Saints: DL Sheldon Rankins – Some semblance of normalcy returns to the draft. Rankins was a player the Saints were connected with for months now, and it makes a ton of sense. Even with the Nick Fairley signing, that was not enough to solve their issue at the 3-technique. Rankins is an explosive interior rusher who can have an immediate impact in a few different spots, and he's a high-character player, which has been an area of focus for the Saints the past two seasons. Grade: A-
13. Miami Dolphins: OL Laremy Tunsil – The fall ends, mercifully. GM Mike Tannenbaum is not scared to make a wave in the draft, and he lands a player whose poorly timed Twitter hack might have caused his slide from the first pick to outside the top dozen. He's an athletic tackle, and it's not a glaring need with Branden Albert at left tackle, but 2014 first-rounder Ja'Wuan James might be tried inside if Tunsil impresses. Right now, he has to rebuild his image, but he's an exceptional talent. Grade: A-
14. Oakland Raiders: S Karl Joseph – Instead of taking Myles Jack and his balky knee, the Raiders went with another medical concern in Joseph, who suffered a torn ACL after three games a year ago. But in those games, and in his Mountaineers career, Joseph established himself as an intense, instinctive hammer of a safety who has great ball skills and is a vocal leader. A classic Al Davis pick (reach?), even if he's been gone for years. The expectation was for Joseph to go later. Grade: C+
Corey Coleman (AP) 15. Cleveland Browns: WR Corey Coleman – The Browns' new regime has had a hard time hiding its love for Coleman, maybe the most explosive receiver in this draft. Fans might get nervous about hearing another Baylor receiver is coming to town, but there is almost no character concern about Coleman, who has overcome a lot in his life. He needs a quarterback, but maybe he and (former Baylor) QB Robert Griffin III can connect on some bombs. Coleman has great speed; drops have been his biggest bugaboo. Grade: B+
16. Detroit Lions: OL Taylor Decker – With the top three tackles off the board here, the Lions probably felt lucky to get Decker, even if we have him ranked a little lower. Still, he could step in right away – at right tackle (Michael Ola?), as an eventual replacement for Riley Reiff or at guard. He fits the mold of new GM Bob Quinn, who spent most of his career with the Patriots: tough, hard-nosed, durable and smart. Decker is a throwback.Grade: C+
17. Atlanta Falcons: SS Keanu Neal – We knew the Falcons liked him. We didn't know they liked him this much. Neal is a pile driver of a hitter – almost to the point where some scouts feared for his long-term safety. “Kiki” had grades all over the board from NFL evaluators; for as much athletic ability as he has, he also has limitations in coverage. Still, head coach Dan Quinn has a Kam Chancellor-esque enforcer in his secondary now. Grade: C
18. Indianapolis Colts: C Ryan Kelly – All along, the narrative was that the Colts needed a tackle, but the truth was the interior was the weakest spot. Kelly is a smart, tough, battle-tested, respected pivot who will be a great match mentally for Andrew Luck. A history of knee injuries for Kelly scared off a few teams, but he was universally praised for his strong virtues. A few ugly games aside, he's as solid as there is on the interior in this draft. Grade: B
19. Buffalo Bills: DL Shaq Lawson – As Rob and Rex Ryan continue transforming their defense more to the 3-4 schemes they've long used – separately and now together – Lawson is an important piece to the mix. He can get after the passer and should provide good support against the run, too. The Bills likely feel lucky he fell into their laps. Lawson might not be special, but he has potential to be a good player for a while. Grade: B+
20. New York Jets: LB Darron Lee – Almost a nickel safety-sized player, Lee is fast and highly athletic to match up with tight ends (um, New England perhaps?) and backs (say, Shady McCoy) right away. He's a good fit on a defense that has a lot of bulk up front, which should keep Lee clean from having to stack and shed linebackers, which is not his strength. Expect Lee to play at one of the inside spots in the Jets' 3-4 scheme, but he has versatility. Grade: B+

21. Houston Texans: WR Will Fuller – The Texans flipped a 2017 sixth-rounder to slide up a spot and guarantee they got the speed option they wanted. There were more complete receivers on the board, such as Laquon Treadwell and Josh Doctson, but the Texans wanted a vertical threat to complement DeAndre Hopkins. Now, with Hopkins, Fuller and Lamar Miller, the Texans have game-changing playmakers. Helps out Brock Osweiler tremendously. Grade: B-
22. Washington Redskins: WR Josh Doctson – Taking the receiver some thought the Texans should have taken, the Redskins add a pick and get a competitive bigger wideout to add to their till. Kirk Cousins now has a middle-of-the-field playmaker whose leaping ability will help with some of the off-target throws the Redskins have lived with. Doctson and Jordan Reed can work the middle, and DeSean Jackson has ownership on the deep routes. The Redskins' offense is evolving. Grade: B+
23. Minnesota Vikings: WR Laquon Treadwell – This makes too much sense. Teddy Bridgewater doesn't need a deep threat -- he needs a chain mover, and a physical one, such as Treadwell. This is an inspired choice that could reshape the Vikings' offense. He'll be a great No. 1 option in the red zone and is also the best blocking receiver in the draft by a mile. A great choice at this point of the draft. Grade: A-
24. Cincinnati Bengals: CB William Jackson III – The Bengals have invested a lot in their secondary – that's three first-rounders at the position in four years – but also lost a starting safety in the offseason. Depth is important, and the long-limbed playmaker Jackson is an interesting study who broke out last season by leading the NCAA in passes defended and was a star in the bowl game win against Florida State. It's a good value pick, and the Bengals show great patience in drafting for need a year in advance for the second straight year. Grade: B
25. Pittsburgh Steelers: CB Artie Burns – Our least favorite pick to this point of the draft. Yes, Burns is a long-armed press corner with passion and he has overcome a lot in his life to get to this level. But there are teams that have stamped fourth-round grades on Burns, and he might not ever be better than a solid No. 3 corner. There were many better options here – perhaps in the front seven. Grade: D+ Paxton Lynch (AP)
26. Denver Broncos: QB Paxton Lynch – The Broncos traded up aggressively for the second straight year to get their guy. Lynch will not be starting Week 1 against the Carolina Panthers, and he might not be ready to be the guy until 2017. But he has a fascinating mix of two players – Brock Osweiler's size and Colin Kaepernick's arm and some of his athletic traits – that the team has been connected with in the past. Lynch is a project but one who could pay off tremendously once he acclimates to Gary Kubiak's offense. Grade: B
27. Green Bay Packers: DL Kenny Clark: The Packers have a history of taking front-seven defenders in the first round, and Clark helps right away. He adds a big body in the middle, which Green Bay needed after B.J. Raji said he's taking a hiatus from the NFL. Clark is an aggressive tackle whose effort won't be questioned. It doesn't solve Green Bay's inside linebacker issues – and the Packers did pass on Reggie Ragland to take Clark – but Clark does provide immediate help to the middle of the defense. Grade: B-
28. San Francisco 49ers: OL Joshua Garnett – So the 49ers moved up to this spot to take a passionate, smart, physical run-blocking guard. Sorry, but we're not jazzed. Garnett is one of the more fun players to talk football with – he's driven and intelligent – and he could start Day 1 at either guard spot. But does he fit with Chip Kelly's preference for lighter-footed offensive linemen? Garnett isn't a total slug, but he might have to take Kelly's renowned health regimen seriously to shape his body better. Grade: C-
29. Arizona Cardinals: DL Robert Nkemdiche – Nkemdiche was the top high school recruit in the country, dominated at times in the SEC, and could be a steal for the Cardinals near the end of the first round. It's reminiscent of the Tyrann Mathieu pick, which paid off in a big way for the Cardinals. Like Mathieu, Nkemdiche slipped in the draft due to off-field red flags. The most troubling incident was when he fell out of the fourth-floor hotel window. But the Cardinals are betting on his talent, which is massive.Grade: B
30. Carolina Panthers: DT Vernon Butler – GM Dave Gettleman's true colors are showing. He likes to build from the inside out, which was clear by letting Josh Norman walk and was very clear by taking Butler at a position of need. Carolina is stocked at defensive tackle with Star Lotulelei and Kawann Short, but Butler's arrival protects the team against either one leaving via free agency after the 2016 season. At 323 pounds, have no illusion: Butler is not playing another position. He could be very good in time.Grade: B-
31. Seattle Seahawks: OL Germain Ifedi – Trading down five spots, the Seahawks got the player they wanted at No. 25. That's always great from a value perspective, and Ifedi has top-15 ability. It didn't always come to fruition at College Station, and it's unclear where Ifedi's best position will be after he struggled at times at left tackle. The Seahawks, as they usually do, gamble on a talent that other teams might not have rated quite as high. Grade: C+




GRADES
1
1
Jared Goff | QBCaliforniaHeight: 6-4   Weight: 215They made the move up to get the passer, and they got the right one.
A-
1
2
Carson Wentz | QBNorth Dakota StateHeight: 6-5   Weight: 237I love the move up to get the passer, but I don´t like Wentz as much as others.
B-
1
3
Joey Bosa | DEOhio StateHeight: 6-5   Weight: 269This kid is a better player than people think. Love this pick for the Chargers.
A
1
4
Ezekiel Elliott | RBOhio StateHeight: 6-0   Weight: 225Good player. Too high. Other needs. Bad pick. He´s a back.
D
1
5
Jalen Ramsey | FSFlorida StateHeight: 6-1   Weight: 209They got lucky to get one of the players they loved. He will play corner for them.
A
1
6
Ronnie Stanley | OTNotre DameHeight: 6-6   Weight: 312Good player, but he needs to be tougher. It fills a need, but he isn´t a good run blocker.
B
1
7
DeForest Buckner | DEOregonHeight: 6-7   Weight: 291This is a great pick. Cleanest, best down player in this draft, Love this pick for the 49ers.
A+
1
8
Jack Conklin | OTMichigan StateHeight: 6-6   Weight: 308He´s a good player, but this is high. He´s a lot like Taylor Lewan, who they already have.
C
1
9
Leonard Floyd | OLBGeorgiaHeight: 6-6   Weight: 244They think he will be a great pass rusher, but I think he´s more like Jamie Collins, just not as good. Aggressive move, but makes sense.
B-
1
10
Eli Apple | CBOhio StateHeight: 6-1   Weight: 199They have corners, so why not a linebacker? Why not Darron Lee?
C
1
11
Vernon Hargreaves III | CBFloridaHeight: 5-10   Weight: 204Solid, solid pick. Good player who starts right away.
B
1
12
Sheldon Rankins | DTLouisvilleHeight: 6-1   Weight: 299He is a "baby Aaron Donald." They need push inside and he is that type of player.
A
1
13
Laremy Tunsil | OTOle MissHeight: 6-5   Weight: 310Look, he´s a hell of a player. This is a steal. Ja´Wuan James must go inside to guard.
A
1
14
Karl Joseph | SSWest VirginiaHeight: 5-10   Weight: 205Love this kid and they need a safety. It makes sense.
B+
1
15
Corey Coleman | WRBaylorHeight: 5-11   Weight: 194I would have gone with another receiver or another position. They need receiver help, but this is the wrong one.
C
1
16
Taylor Decker | OTOhio StateHeight: 6-7   Weight: 310I like him more than Conklin. He will really help their offensive line.
B
1
17
Keanu Neal | SSFloridaHeight: 6-0   Weight: 211I heard Dan Quinn loved him, but this is too high. They see him as another Kam Chancellor. I don´t like this pick.
C+
1
18
Ryan Kelly | CAlabamaHeight: 6-4   Weight: 311Love this pick for the Colts. They had to get him. Great pick.
A+
1
19
Shaq Lawson | DEClemsonHeight: 6-3   Weight: 269I don´t like Lawson as much as others, but it is a need for the Bills. Maybe Rex Ryan can drop him into coverage too. Right, Mario Williams?
B-
1
20
Darron Lee | OLBOhio StateHeight: 6-1   Weight: 232Like this pick a lot. He is a speed linebacker and they need speed on defense. Good pick.
B+
1
21
Will Fuller | WRNotre DameHeight: 6-0   Weight: 186They needed to add speed and stretch the field. He´s not as good as some other receivers, but he can fly. It makes sense.
B
1
22
Josh Doctson | WRTCUHeight: 6-2   Weight: 202They have two receivers coming to the end of their contracts. I like it.
A-
1
23
Laquon Treadwell | WROle MissHeight: 6-2   Weight: 221This is a great pick. They have the next Dez Bryant.
A
1
24
William Jackson III | CBHoustonHeight: 6-0   Weight: 189Love this pick for the Bengals. He is a playmaker. They love drafting corners.
A
1
25
Artie Burns | CBMiami (Fla.)Height: 6-0   Weight: 193He´s got a ton of athletic ability and he fills a big-time need. Solid pick.
B
1
26
Paxton Lynch | QBMemphisHeight: 6-7   Weight: 244I like the idea of going up to get the franchise passer. John Elway likes big passers and he has another one.
B+
1
27
Kenny Clark | DTUCLAHeight: 6-3   Weight: 314Every time I watched Myles Jack on tape, this kid flashed. I thought he would go here. It made sense.
B+
1
28
Joshua Garnett | OGStanfordHeight: 6-4   Weight: 312They needed guard help, so it makes sense. I liked him, but some scouts thought he was soft.
B-
1
29
Robert Nkemdiche | DTOle MissHeight: 6-3   Weight: 294Love this player if he can stay in line. He has a ton of talent.
A
1
30
Vernon Butler | DTLouisiana TechHeight: 6-4   Weight: 323Good player, but do they need him? Really?
C-
1
31
Germain Ifedi | OTTexas A&MHeight: 6-6   Weight: 324They added extra picks and traded down to get a good lineman.
B

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