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Monday, October 24, 2011

NBA Lock-Out-Would Lovie Smith be interested in Buckeyes?-NCAA pushes $2K increase for athletes - Top 25 College Football Polls -



Expect NBA to indefinitely postpone start of season soon

When the NBA labor talks blew up last Thursday, we all knew it would just be a matter of time before more games were cancelled. Probably Monday or Tuesday of this week. The first two weeks of the season we already toast so what was next, another two weeks?
How about just saying it’s indefinite?
That’s what is likely to come down in the next 48 hours. Ken Berger at CBSSports.com tweets.
Pretty widely expected that NBA’s next announcement will be that start of season postponed “indefinitely,” or “until further notice.”
Question is, will league and union meet/bargain before that announcement is made? Nothing planned for (Sunday), source says.
It is expected that the two sides will sit down again later this week, although nothing is yet set up. That’s the pattern of these talks: meet for a few days, have an ugly break up with public sniping, calm down for a few days then get back at it. The two sides are dug in and while you and I could find a middle ground that would end this lockout pretty quickly, right now neither side will go there.





Would Lovie Smith be interested in Buckeyes?

What if Ohio State wants to make a coaching change and Urban Meyer isn't the guy? There are no obvious choices out there, no former Ohio State coaches or players who seem ready to step up and take what figures to be a daunting job. Michigan State and Nebraska just increased the salaries of former OSU defensive coordinator Mark Dantonio and former OSU player Bo Pelini in what appeared to be pre-emptive strikes. But frankly, neither was (or is) a slam dunk to get the job. Chicago Bears coach Lovie Smith might have a shot if he wants it; unlike a lot of pro coaches, he has college coaching in his background and was a good recruiter when he was an assistant at Ohio State.



BCS Standings

1 LSU .9702 1 1 2854 .9927 1 1457 .9878 3 3 1 3 2 3 3 .930
2 Alabama .9627 2 2 2777 .9659 2 1434 .9722 2 2 3 2 3 2 2 .950
3 Oklahoma State .9240 4 3 2559 .8901 4 1301 .8820 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1.000
4 Boise State .8302 5 5 2410 .8383 5 1213 .8224 5 5 4 4 6 8 6 .830
5 Clemson .8240 7 6 2346 .8160 6 1174 .7959 4 6 5 5 4 4 4 .860
6 Stanford .8124 8 4 2523 .8776 3 1327 .8997 9 7 6 8 14 21 9 .660
7 Oregon .6877 10 7 2136 .7430 7 1121 .7600 12 14 7 12 12 12 12 .560
8 Kansas State .6681 11 10 1764 .6136 12 827 .5607 5 4 9 6 5 5 5 .830
9 Oklahoma .6642 3 8 1866 .6490 9 964 .6536 7 8 8 7 8 11 14 .690
10 Arkansas .6581 9 9 1851 .6438 8 974 .6603 8 12 11 15 7 6 7 .670
11 Michigan State


AP Top 25

1 LSU (49) 8-0 1489 1
2 Alabama (10) 8-0 1448 2
3 Oklahoma State 7-0 1326 6
4 Stanford 7-0 1318 7
5 Boise State (1) 7-0 1269 5
6 Clemson 8-0 1225 8
7 Oregon 6-1 1136 9
8 Arkansas 6-1 1003 10
9 Michigan State 6-1 964 15
10 Kansas State 7-0 945 12
11 Oklahoma 6-1 912 3
12 Wisconsin 6-1 887 4
13 Nebraska 6-1 756 13
14 South Carolina 6-1 675 14
15 Virginia Tech 7-1 673 16
16 Texas A&M 5-2 614 17
17 Michigan 6-1 508 18
18 Houston 7-0 400 21
19 Texas Tech 5-2 350 NR
20 USC 6-1 340 NR
21 Penn State 7-1 312 NR
22 Georgia 5-2 290 24
23 Arizona State 5-2 239 24
24 Cincinnati 6-1 71 NR
25 West Virginia 5-2 64




NCAA pushes $2K increase for athletes
WASHINGTON -- NCAA president Mark Emmert said Monday that he supports a proposal to allow conferences to increase grants to student athletes by $2,000, "to more closely approach" the full cost of attending college, beyond the athletic scholarships athletes receive for tuition, fees, room, board and books.
Emmert told the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics that the proposal will be finalized this week and he'll ask the NCAA to support it. He noted that student athletes have limited opportunities to work outside the classroom and playing fields, and that the current model of athletic scholarship has not changed for 40 years.
Emmert said he'll also ask the board to allow colleges and universities to provide multiyear grants, instead of year-to-year grants.

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